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A 737 Max 8 plane destined for China Southern Airlines sits at the Boeing Co. manufacturing facility in Renton, Washington, U.S., on Tuesday, Mar. 12, 2019. The Boeing 737 Max crash in Ethiopia looks increasingly likely to hit the planemaker's order book as mounting safety concerns prompt airlines to reconsider purchases worth about $55 billion. (Photo: David Ryder/Bloomberg) A 737 Max 8 plane destined for China Southern Airlines sits at the Boeing Co. manufacturing facility in Renton, Washington, U.S., on Tuesday, Mar. 12, 2019. The Boeing 737 Max crash in Ethiopia looks increasingly likely to hit the planemaker’s order book as mounting safety concerns prompt airlines to reconsider purchases worth about $55 billion. (Photo: David Ryder/Bloomberg)

Before Boeing 737s started falling from the sky, it was hard for travelers to avoid feeling at least a twinge of nostalgia for the airplane.

Elana Ashanti Jefferson

Executive Editor Elana Ashanti Jefferson is a veteran journalist and communications professional. She can be reached by sending email to ejefferson@alm.com.

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