From 2000-2019, the average rotor diameter of an onshore wind turbine blade in the U.S. increased from 48 meters to 121 meters and the average hub increased from 58 meters to 90 meters. As turbines increase in size, so does the value of any one individual claim. (Credit: engel.ac/Adobe Stock) From 2000-2019, the average rotor diameter of an onshore wind turbine blade in the U.S. increased from 48 meters to 121 meters and the average hub increased from 58 meters to 90 meters. As turbines increase in size, so does the value of any one individual claim. (Credit: engel.ac/Adobe Stock)

Developments in wind turbine technology have been one of the key drivers in reducing the cost of renewable energy production and fueling the growth of the wind industry over the past decade.

While the rate of change in wind turbine technology has been astonishing, improving levels of energy production and resilience to external forces such as weather, this rapid evolution has also posed questions for underwriters.

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