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Hand with black glove taking money from the cookie jar. Photo: BeeBright/Shutterstock Insurance companies claim property insurance lawyers have been “double-dipping” by applying fee multipliers in too many cases, while lawyers claim the multiplier measure is there for a good reason. (Photo: BeeBright/Shutterstock)

A bill working its way through the Florida Legislature would curb the use of attorney-fee multipliers — bad news for plaintiffs counsel who represent clients on a contingency basis, but a boon for the insurance industry, which claims attorneys often charge three times their hourly rate for routine property cases.

Senate Bill 914 has jumped its first hurdle, gaining approval from the Florida Senate Committee on Banking and Insurance. It reflects a conflict between attorneys — who say the proposed law would prevent homeowners from suing insurers — and insurers, who say some lawyers take advantage by tripling their fees for routine cases.

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