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The federal government has increased its disaster funding dramatically in recent years, a function of both people living in risky places and, in many cases, risks themselves increasing because of climate change. (Photo: iStock) The federal government has increased its disaster funding dramatically in recent years, a function of both people living in risky places and, in many cases, risks themselves increasing because of climate change. (Photo: iStock)

(Bloomberg) — Forecasters are expecting this year’s North Atlantic hurricane season to be roughly average, with about 14 named storms including six full-fledged hurricanes.

Last week, the government finally dealt with the fallout from 2018, enacting a $19.1 billion relief package to help U.S. towns and cities still recovering from last year’s natural disasters. Even before that, 2018 had already drawn more emergency funding than any year since 2005, the costliest year on record.

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