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The disclosures followed criticism from airlines and crash victims’ relatives that Boeing hasn’t been forthcoming about issues with the 737 Max, which has been grounded since a second crash in March, in Ethiopia. The disclosures followed criticism from airlines and crash victims’ relatives that Boeing hasn’t been forthcoming about issues with the 737 Max, which has been grounded since a second crash in March, in Ethiopia. (Photo: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg)

(Bloomberg) — Boeing Co. knew months before a deadly 737 Max crash that a cockpit alert wasn’t working the way the company had told buyers of the single-aisle jetliner. But the planemaker didn’t share its findings with airlines or the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) until after a Lion Air plane went down off the coast of Indonesia in October, according to a Boeing statement as it provided additional details of an issue that first came to light last week.

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