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Boeing 737 Max 9 An employee stands next to a Boeing Co. 737 Max 9 plane at the company’s manufacturing facility in Renton, Washington. The erratic, six-minute flight of the Ethiopian Airlines plane convinced the FAA that it was close enough to what preceded the Oct. 29 crash of another Max off the coast of Indonesia to warrant concern.  (Photo: David Ryder/Bloomberg)

The first concrete evidence of a possible link between two deadly Boeing 737 Max crashes came from space.

A new satellite network capable of tracking planes in high fidelity across the globe captured the flight path of the Boeing Co. 737 Max that crashed Sunday. The data was critical in persuading the U.S. to join the rest of the world in grounding the jet, according to industry and regulatory officials.

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