Samantha Masunaga of the Los Angeles Times, cites a study by PwC that says by 2030, 38% of American jobs will be held by robots. That's more than for jobs in Britain, Germany, or Japan. "The report says the financial and insurance sector has a much higher possibility of automation in the U.S. than in Britain," where the outlook tends to be international, and U.S. counterparts "do not need to have the same educational levels," hence "jobs that require less education are at higher potential risk of automation." When self-driving vehicles have the ability to report accidents directly, who needs a human for "claim intake"?

Even by 2020, a growing number of insurance-related jobs may be disappearing in the U.S. Those best placed for the future will be individuals with excellent language skills. While science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) will remain important subjects for graduate and post-graduate employment (designing those robots), "soft social skills" such as language, psychology and sociology will have increasing value. So will the ability to write logically.

One way of analyzing employees, suggests Marc S. Bashoor, a fire chief in Prince George's County, Maryland, is the 10/80/10 method. In his January 2107, Firehouse Magazine article, he suggests that "80% of the people are working for the right reasons, with the right moral and mental focus, prepared to do the business of the people [or employer]…. These folks make sure the organization stays on track. [This] is where … followers, managers and leaders fit."

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