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Glendale Fire Department firefighter Chris Greene, right, gets a case of water from service worker Edi Marroquin, left, from the dozens of cases of water at the Glendale Fire Department Resource Center as they prepare for the record-setting heat predicted for the weekend Thursday, June 16, 2016, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

(Bloomberg) – The hottest weather in decades gripped parts of Southern California and the Southwest for a second day Monday as utilities urged customers to conserve power and cities opened public pools and cooling centers to people desperate for relief.

At least four hikers died in Arizona, where on Sunday Phoenix set a record for the date of 118 degrees Fahrenheit (48 Celsius), AccuWeather Inc. reported. More of the same was forecast for Monday. It was 109 in Burbank, California, on Sunday, besting the mark set in 1973, and temperatures there reached 106 before noon Monday, the first day of summer.

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