(Bloomberg Business) -- Researchers at Yale have unveileda new interactivemap that estimates public opinion on global warmingright down to the county level.

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As a nation, 63% of Americans believe that the globe is warming.(Note: It is.) But that single statistic reveals little aboutwhat people in different states, local communities, andcongressional districts think. The research, which was publishedtoday in the journal Nature Climate Change, makesestimates for those geographies and asks:

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* Whether people believe humans are causing most of the warming(Note: They are.)

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* If people are aware that scientists understand the worldis warming.

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* What implications of the warming may be: Are people afraid?For themselves? For people in developing countries? For the future?Should we fund renewables, regulate carbon, or dosomething else?

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The research is primarily based on data from 12 surveysconducted between 2008 and 2013 by the Yale Projecton Climate Communication and the George Mason Centerfor Climate ChangeCommunication. The results were analyzedusing a relatively new statistical technique developed by politicalscientists that allowed the team to project public opinionon climate change from demographic and geographic data.The results were then compared with independent state and localsurveys to make sure they held up.

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The map built by the Yale center is accessibleto the public, and it may be useful to anyone from governmentmanagers who workon climate adaptation, to politicalcampaigners, even to businessesselling climate-friendly products. "I could foresee somecommercial purposes," said Anthony Leiserowitz, director of theYale center. "That's not why we did this."

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Click through to see seven maps, each of which looks at howestimates of U.S. public opinion change in response tovarious climate-related questions and is organised bycongressional district.

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Americans understand that the world is warming. Virtually everydistrict is tan—which represents 50% of public opinion—or a darkershade of orange or red.

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The country shows more of a split on whether humans aredriving global warming. The most authoritative body of scientists,the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, affirmed lastyear that humans "have been the dominant cause of the observedwarming since the mid-20th century."

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Fewer Americans in general are aware of the scientific consensusabout climate change, perhaps a sign of the intensepoliticization of the topic in the U.S.

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Americans are in strongest agreement about funding research intorenewable energy. Solar and wind energy have already maturedenough in several states that they are competitive with orcheaper than conventional electricity.

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About 63% of the country supports the regulation of carbondioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants, which is good,because the White House is expected to finalize its rules thissummer.

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The nation is cool on the idea of a carbon tax, even if theproceeds are disseminated back to the public.

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Finally, the new mapping tool's county-level data show howdiverse even the electorally "reddest" or "bluest" of statesare.

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NOAA NCDC/CICS-NC

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Driving public opinion data in the long-run is climatechange itself. Since 1991, temperatures across the U.S. haverisen on average between 1 degree and 1.5 degree Fahrenheit,slightly less so in the Southeast, according to the latest National Climate Assessment.

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The colors on the map show temperature changes between 1991 and2012, from the 1901-1960 average (from the 1951-1980 average forAlaska and Hawaii). The period from 2001 to 2012 was warmer thanany previous decade in every region.

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