The head of Maryland's Workers' Insurance Fund will receive twoyears salary and health benefits after he steps down from his postto face federal corruption charges stemming from his term as statesenator.

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Thomas Bromwell, 57 years-old, chief executive officer andpresident of the Injured Workers' Insurance Fund, will step downfrom his post Dec. 31, according to a statement from the fund.

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Mr. Bromwell will be replaced on an interim basis by IWIFchairman Daniel E. McKew until a replacement is found.

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"The board expresses its sincere appreciation to Thomas Bromwellfor his exceptional leadership of IWIF and wishes him a successfuloutcome of his trial, which we recognize will require his full andundivided attention," Mr. McKew said in a statement.

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Under the agreement, Mr. Bromwell will receive two years salary,or $400,000 total, as was outlined in his employment contract. IWIFwill also continue to pay the premiums for his health coverage fora period of 18 months under a precedent set prior to Mr. Bromwell'sjoining the fund. Additionally, Mr. Bromwell will be able topurchase his company-provided automobile at the current fair-marketvalue.

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Prior to joining IWIF in 2002, Mr. Bromwell served in theMaryland General Assembly for 23 years. During his last eight yearsthere he served as president of the state Senate FinanceCommittee.

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A federal grand jury indicted Mr. Bromwell in October of 2005 oncharges of accepting bribes from a local construction company,Poole and Kent Co., during his time in the state Senate in exchangefor steering state contracts to the firm.

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Prosecutors allege that the construction firm obtained millionsof dollars of state contracts in exchange for providing his wife,Mary Pat, with a fake job. She was also indicted.

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Additionally, prosecutors allege that the construction firm didmore than $85,000 worth of work on the Bromwells' home at nocost.

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Mr. and Mrs. Bromwell have pled not guilty to the charges. Atrial is set to begin in March in federal court in Baltimore. Bothcould face a maximum of 20 years in prison.

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The head of the construction firm, W. David Stoffregen, pledguilty to charges connected to the case and is cooperating withprosecutors.

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