Filed Under:Claims, Catastrophe & Restoration

Hurricane Nate makes landfall in Mississippi as a Category 1 storm

A sailboat washes ashore along the Gulf of Mexico in Biloxi, Miss., in the aftermath of Hurricane Nate, Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
A sailboat washes ashore along the Gulf of Mexico in Biloxi, Miss., in the aftermath of Hurricane Nate, Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

As the fourth hurricane to hit the United States in two months, Hurricane Nate made landfall in Mississippi early on Oct. 8, bringing strong winds and heavy rainfall to the region.

Hurricane Nate upgraded from a tropical storm to a Category 1 hurricane on Oct. 6 and was expected to make landfall in the U.S. as a Category 2, but luckily, the storm did not intensify.

Related: What businesses can learn from Harvey and Irma before the next hurricane

Nate came ashore near the mouth of the Mississippi River at 7:00 p.m. CDT on Oct. 7 before making landfall near Biloxi, Mississippi at approximately 12:30 a.m. on Oct. 8, bringing torrential rains and peak winds of 85 mph. The storm dissipated rapidly after hitting the area, and luckily, expected storm surges of 8 to 11 feet never materialized.

Catastrophe modeling firm AIR Worldwide reports heavy rainfall between 3 and 6 inches is expected across Mississippi, Louisiana, and some parts of the South as the storm, now downgraded to a tropical depression, continues to move inland.

Related: How to work with your insurance agent to file your claim effectively

Structual damage limited


Unlike recent hurricanes, Nate wasn’t expected to cause any structural damage in the southern U.S., and so far, AIR says reported structural damage to buildings has been limited. Nicaragua and Costa Rica experienced extensive flooding from Nate, but there are very few reports of flood damage in the U.S. 

According to an AIR report, some structural damage to homes and businesses is possible, as well as a weakening of some foundations caused by heavy rain and surge, with some homes removed from their foundations entirely. The report warns roads and bridges, including escape routes, could also get washed out, leading to closures.

Nate’s winds may cause damage to roofing and siding materials, porches, awnings, carports, and sheds, AIR warns. Mobile homes, especially those that are unanchored, could experience significant wind damage. Unsecured, lightweight objects could become airborne and cause damage as projectiles, particularly to windows, which could allow water into structures.

Related: How homeowners can protect their property

Karen Clark & Company estimates the insured loss in the U.S. from Hurricane Nate will near $500 million. The estimate includes insured wind and storm surge losses to residential, commercial and industrial properties and autos.

Continue to see the damage from Hurricane Nate:

Sunken boat in Mississippi

A shrimp boat is sunk at its mooring along the Pascagoula River in Moss Point, Miss., on Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017, after Hurricane Nate made landfall on Mississippi's Gulf Coast. David Nelson said the boat belongs to his father and will be repaired. (AP Photo/Jeff Amy)

Related: New report details financial impact of September’s historical natural disasters

Pumpkins scattered across the beach

Pumpkins are strewn along the Gulf of Mexico in Pass Christian, Miss., in the aftermath of Hurricane Nate, Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Flooding from Hurricane Nate

A car passes a log and other debris on U.S. 90 in Biloxi, Miss, before dawn early Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017. Hurricane Nate brought flooding and power outages to the Gulf Coast as it sloshed ashore outside Biloxi early Sunday, the first hurricane to make landfall in Mississippi since Hurricane Katrina in 2005. (AP Photo/Jeff Amy)

Related: ‘Extremely active’ hurricane season is 3rd worst on record

Truck drives through flooding in Mississippi

A truck drives through a flooded Water St. in downtown Mobile, Ala., during Hurricane Nate, Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017, in Mobile, Ala. Hurricane Nate is the first hurricane to make landfall in the state since Hurricane Katrina in 2005. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Boat washes ashore

A sailboat is washed up on the beach in Biloxi, Miss., early Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017, after Hurricane Nate came ashore on the Mississippi Gulf Coast. (AP Photo/Jeff Amy)

Related: Florida to deploy anti-fraud strike teams in Hurricane Irma aftermath

Children swim in flooded streets after Hurricane NateChildren make their way through the flood water that filled their front yard after Hurricane Nate, Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017, in Coden, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Workers clear streets

Workers clear trees from the streets and power lines in Biloxi, Miss., in the aftermath of Hurricane Nate, Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Related: Catastrophe global re/insurance losses will exceed $100 billion in 2017, Fitch says

Tropical storm Nate hits Costa Rica

A 'men at work' sign stands on a washed out road in Alajuelita on the outskirts of San Jose, Costa Rica, Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017. Tropical Storm Nate formed off the coast of Nicaragua on Thursday and was being blamed for at least 17 deaths in Central America as it spun north toward a potential landfall on the U.S. Gulf Coast as a hurricane over the weekend. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

Tropical storm Nate hits Costa Rica

Neighbors walk under the rain past a washed out road and landslide in Alajuelita on the outskirts of San Jose, Costa Rica, Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

Related: Chubb to face up to $1.3 billion in losses from Harvey, Irma

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