Filed Under:Agent Broker, Personal Insurance Business

Top 10 States Most Susceptible to Storm Surge Damage

Although hurricanes are usually associated with southern coastal states, Hurricane Irene and even more recently, Superstorm Sandy serve as reminders that these are not the only states at risk.

No geographic region along the Gulf of Mexico or Atlantic Ocean is safe from hurricane damage, and in turn, storm surges. More than 4 million properties valued at $1.1 trillion are exposed to storm surge damage, triggered by high winds and low pressure associated with hurricanes.

A state’s total risk of exposure depends on a variety of factors, including trends in population and residential development, geographic risk factors and length of the coastline. In its 2013 Storm Surge Report, CoreLogic took these elements into account to compile a list of states with the most properties susceptible to storm surge damage.

  1. Florida (1,478,858 properties at risk)
  2. Louisiana (411,052 properties at risk)
  3. Texas (369,577 properties at risk)
  4. New Jersey (350,577 properties at risk)
  5. Virginia (329,234 properties at risk)
  6. New York (270,458 properties at risk)
  7. North Carolina (232,212 properties at risk)
  8. South Carolina (196,784 properties at risk)
  9. Georgia (118,004 properties at risk)
  10. Massachusetts (107,657 properties at risk)

Read more on the report at propertycasualty360.com.

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