Filed Under:Claims, Auto

Sixth Best-Selling Car Is Also Most Stolen

The New York Insurance Association named the 2000 Honda Civic the most frequently stolen vehicle in New York State for the third year in a row. The Civic made another list in 2009, ranking sixth on the "Automotive News" list of the ten best-selling cars in the U.S. that year.

The Hot Wheels 2010 study released by the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) examines data reported to the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) and determines the vehicle make, model, and model year reported stolen most frequently in 2009.

In 2009, the most stolen vehicles* in New York State were:

  1. 2000 Honda Civic
  2. 1994 Honda Accord
  3. 1996 Dodge Caravan
  4. 1991 Toyota Camry
  5. 1997 Nissan Maxima
  6. 2005 Nissan Altima
  7. 2009 Toyota Corolla
  8. 1997 Jeep Cherokee/Grand Cherokee
  9. 2003 Ford Explorer
  10. 1998 Plymouth Voyager

The most stolen vehicles* in the nation during 2009 were:

  1. 1994 Honda Accord
  2. 1995 Honda Civic
  3. 1991 Toyota Camry
  4. 1997 Ford F-150 Pickup
  5. 2004 Dodge Ram Pickup
  6. 2000 Dodge Caravan
  7. 1994 Chevrolet Pickup (Full Size)
  8. 1994 Acura Integra
  9. 2002 Ford Explorer
  10. 2009 Toyota Corolla

According to the FBI, the number of vehicle thefts in New York decreased by 13 percent from 2008 to 2009, falling from 25,114 to 21,870 total reported thefts.

"Motor vehicle theft continues to decline in New York State," Ellen Melchionni, president of NYIA said. "But drivers still need to take prudent steps to prevent their vehicle from being stolen."

NYIA and NICB recommend that drivers employ a "layered approach" to make their vehicles less attractive to potential thieves. By taking simple steps such as installing warning devices in their vehicles, consumers can drive down the frequency of both auto theft, and auto insurance claims.

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